Petition to Conduct CBI Enquiry into Murder of Dr J A Mathan

Tuesday, 28 August 2012

The Spirit of Radical Feminism: The Jezebel Spirit

What is the Evil Spirit behind Radical Feminism? 

It is the spirit of Jezebel and Ashtoreth.
Key Characteristics of a Jezebel Spirit: The Evil Spirit of Radical Feminism
Control-freak and Manipulator
Power Seeker
Usurper of Genuine Religious Authority; Enemy of True Christians
Pretentious Liar
Prideful, Vain and Narcissistic
Denier of Guilt or Responsibility; Unrepentant
Jealous
Bitter and Resenting
Warlike and Vicious
Feminist and Men Hater
(Self-)destructive
Claims Undue Credit, Denies Others Due Credit
Information Gatherers
Sower of Confusion and Insecurity
http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2009/10/21/when-love-yields-to-fear-what-is-a-jezebel-spirit-all-about-part-33/#How
“The importance of mother goddesses in the various mythologies of paganism .........…The mother goddess received different names and external appearances, but, in substance, she was always the same. In Egypt, she was called Isis. In Crete, she was represented as a mother who made friendly contact with snakes. In Greece she was known as Demeter, and in Rome she was worshiped as Cybele, the Magna Mater (Great Mother), a mother goddess of Phrygian origin. There is practically no ancient culture that did not worship this type of deity.”
Jezebel Compared to Hare’s Checklist of Psychopathy
On reflecting on all of the above characteristics, it should be clear that we are dealing with an extremely ferocious and malicious spirit indeed. In fact, it is so utterly uncaring for the interests of other people that will be interesting to find out just how closely a typical thoroughbred Jezebel satisfies the criteria for clinical psychopathy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychopathy#Diagnostic_criteria_and_PCL-R_assessment
The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) is a diagnostic tool used to rate a person’s psychopathic or antisocial tendencies. People who are psychopathic prey ruthlessly on others using charm, deceit, violence or other methods that allow them to get what they want. The symptoms of psychopathy include: lack of a conscience or sense of guilt, lack of empathy, egocentricity, pathological lying, repeated violations of social norms, disregard for the law, shallow emotions, and a history of victimizing others. http://www.minddisorders.com/Flu-Inv/Hare-Psychopathy-Checklist.html

Here’s the score convention of the Hare checklist:
When properly completed by a qualified professional, the PCL-R provides a total score that indicates how closely the test subject matches the “perfect” score that a classic or prototypical psychopath would rate. Each of the twenty items is given a score of 0, 1, or 2 based on how well it applies to the subject being tested. A prototypical psychopath would receive a maximum score of 40, while someone with absolutely no psychopathic traits or tendencies would receive a score of zero. A score of 30 or above qualifies a person for a diagnosis of psychopathy. People with no criminal backgrounds normally score around 5. Many non-psychopathic criminal offenders score around 22.

We see that a typical Jezebel scores at least 37 points. By satisfying the check-list to such outstanding degree, a Jezebel spirit finding expression in a consistently willing or relenting human host, demonstrates to indeed have the character of a (virtual) prototypical psychopath.

Let’s go over the entire checklist point-by-point:
Jezebel’s Character compared to the Hare Psychopathy Checklist
TraitEstimated Score + Comment
glib and superficial charmScore=2 … Jezebels resort to pretense and trickery to hide their blackened character and ditto actions behind.
grandiose (exaggeratedly high) estimation of selfScore=2 … Jezebels are vain to the point of being narcissistic and therefore are too proud to think less of themselves.
need for stimulationScore=2 … Since they are warlike, vicious and seek power they naturally gravitate to “action.”
pathological lyingScore=2 … It’s part of the bag of tricks to help gain what they want. Jezebels excel in lying.
cunning and manipulativenessScore=2 … Jezebels obsessively use manipulation to satisfy their desires and attain their goals.
lack of remorse or guiltScore=2 … They feel they do not and cannot do anything wrong. Their pride and vanity prevents them from being able to do so.
shallow affect(superficial emotional responsiveness)Score=2 … Jezebels are shallow when it comes to anyone but themselves, period. Unless it serves their interests they will only superficially pretend to show affection for others.
callousness and lack of empathyScore=2 … By their warlike and manipulative character Jezebels demonstrate to not care for people other than themselves.
parasitic lifestyleScore=2 … It’s the consequence of seeking to usurp (religious) authority and the power from other people who are deemed “useful”. Jezebels use people and when they are “done” with them, they drop ‘em like hot potatoes.
poor behavioral controlsScore=2 … Jezebels know no ethical restraints.
sexual promiscuityScore=2 … This is implied by the willingness of Jezebels to apply sexual seduction to meet their goals.
early behavior problemsScore=2 … Their lack of concern for other beings makes them prone to all kinds of behavioral problems. It is also in their nature though to cover up their behavior by cunning, deceit, pretense and denial.
lack of realistic long-term goalsScore=2 …  Ego dominated thinking is necessarily myopic in nature. On a more philosophical note, goals detached from God are always unrealistic in the long run.
impulsivityScore=2 … Jezebels think firstly about themselves and secondly about… themselves also. If they feel their egos are challenged they act swiftly and ruthlessly.
irresponsibilityScore=2 … If something goes wrong, it is always the fault of someone else. Jezebels never take responsibility for something that has gone wrong. They do however claim credit for something they do not do, if it only makes them look better.
failure to accept responsibility for own actionsScore=2 … Jezebels cannot “lower” themselves to feel responsible and display sympathy for a disadvantaged party. They probably rationalize it away, claiming that they merely deserved it or that it was “tough luck” etc.
many short-term marital relationshipsScore=1 … Given the inclination of Jezebels to use sexual seduction as a weapon this may indeed pose problems in regards to loyalty to possible spouses. This point needs individual assessment though.
juvenile delinquencyScore=2 … Because of their lack of ethical consciousness there is a systemic lack of  inhibition to commit crime, in all age-groups.
revocation of conditional releaseScore=1 … Likely but to be decided on an individual basis…
criminal versatilityScore=1 … It’s a consequence of their unscrupulousness and the absence of ethical inhibition. “The end justifies the means,” is their credo. If a crime needs to be committed, then so be it.

How to Deal with Jezebel Spirits
Confrontation is really the only “cure” in dealing with a Jezebel spirit. The problem is that many people fear confrontation, knowing it will create an ugly scene. Therefore they prolong the inevitable.

Jezebel wants to paralyze with fear, condemnation, depression, apathy or whatever it takes until we withdraw. The only answer for those under Jezebel’s attack is perseverance in battle. We must remain on course no matter how long it takes!

Indeed confrontation and perseverance is required in dealing with the Jezebel spirit. I can say out of my own experience that Jezebel will hold out to the very end. She is very aggressive and tenacious. You cannot afford to ignore her because she will do damage. It is therefore important to make hosts, or captives, realize that they are protecting her and allow her to stay as long as they deny that she’s in them or are too ashamed to repent for their sins. Once that groundwork has been done though, preparations for deliverance can be done and she can be evicted relatively easily.

Jezebel needs to be dealt with ruthlessly and without compromise:
True, fervent intercessory prayer causes hearts to change from pride and loftiness to repentance and humility; nothing brings a greater death blow to the spirit of Jezebel.

First, we must rid ourselves of Jezebel’s ways. We cannot cast out lust when we harbor lust in our lives. We cannot bring down a spirit of control if we use manipulation and hype to control our congregations. We must examine our own ways, and repent of Jezebel.
Second, it takes Jehu. Although Elijah was Jezebel’s enemy, it took JEHU to trample Jezebel.

Jehu took no prisoners and showed no mercy to Jezebel. He had singleness of purpose and was driven by it. As he approached Jezebel those who saw his chariot noted he “drives furiously” (2Ki 9:20). When others offered peace and compromise, Jehu responded “How can there be peace as long as the harlotries and witchcrafts of Jezebel are many?” (2Ki 9:22)

This is repeated in the NT: “What accord has Christ with Belial? Or what portion does a believer share with an unbeliever?” (2Co 6:15) NO COMPROMISE

Jehu would not rest until Jezebel was dead. Her pleasures could not attract him. Her threats did not deter him. He would not tolerate Jezebel.

Jesus says we too cannot TOLERATE Jezebel. (Rev 2:20) We must learn the prophetic power of the word “No!” We must give no ground.

When Jezebel attempted to captivate Jehu, he did not even allow himself to be drawn into conversation with her. Instead, he called on her eunuchs (a type of today’s men) to cast her down from her balcony. Those with the Jehu anointing will call to Jezebel’s emasculated slaves to rise up above their miserable situation, and they too will cast her down, and be set free.
To confront this spirit, we must be ruthless toward it, showing no mercy and no sympathy toward it and its behavior. We must realize that we are dealing with an evil spirit, and although we must be compassionate to the person in its clutches, we must deal a death blow to the evil spirit.

First, we must rid ourselves of Jezebel’s ways. We cannot cast out lust when we harbor lust in our lives. We cannot bring down a spirit of control if we use manipulation and hype to control our congregations. We must examine our own ways, and repent of Jezebel.
Second, it takes Jehu. Although Elijah was Jezebel’s enemy, it took JEHU to trample Jezebel.

Jehu took no prisoners and showed no mercy to Jezebel. He had singleness of purpose and was driven by it. As he approached Jezebel those who saw his chariot noted he “drives furiously” (2Ki 9:20). When others offered peace and compromise, Jehu responded “How can there be peace as long as the harlotries and witchcrafts of Jezebel are many?” (2Ki 9:22)

This is repeated in the NT: “What accord has Christ with Belial? Or what portion does a believer share with an unbeliever?” (2Co 6:15) NO COMPROMISE

Jehu would not rest until Jezebel was dead. Her pleasures could not attract him. Her threats did not deter him. He would not tolerate Jezebel.

Jesus says we too cannot TOLERATE Jezebel. (Rev 2:20) We must learn the prophetic power of the word “No!” We must give no ground.

When Jezebel attempted to captivate Jehu, he did not even allow himself to be drawn into conversation with her. Instead, he called on her eunuchs (a type of today’s men) to cast her down from her balcony. Those with the Jehu anointing will call to Jezebel’s emasculated slaves to rise up above their miserable situation, and they too will cast her down, and be set free.

To confront this spirit, we must be ruthless toward it, showing no mercy and no sympathy toward it and its behavior. We must realize that we are dealing with an evil spirit, and although we must be compassionate to the person in its clutches, we must deal a death blow to the evil spirit.
Anyone who is hit by this spirit needs, first of all, to repent deeply of their sympathetic thoughts toward it, and then war against it! Do not waste days and weeks under condemnation. Separate yourself from that Jezebelian thinking which was fostered upon you in your youth, pick up the sword of the Spirit, and war against the principality of Jezebel! Pray for the saints in your church. Pray for the Christians throughout your community. If you war against Jezebel when you are tempted, eventually you are going to be dangerous! This spirit will stop attacking you once it recognizes that your aggressive counterattack is setting other people free!
Jezebel hates prayer. Intercessory prayer pries her fingers off the hearts and souls of men. It sets people free in the spirit. When you pray, it binds her. When you pray against immorality, it cripples her. When you pray for a submissive heart, it is like trampling of Jehu’s horse upon her body.
If a man has relinquished his headship authority to a Jezebelian wife, Frangipane writes:
God’s answer to dealing with Jezebel is not to exchange one form of oppression (Jezebel’s), for another (the man’s). God’s objective is to replace Jezebel’s concept of security with the security a woman receives when she is tenderly loved by her husband. Thus, the man wins the war against Jezebel by becoming Christlike.
The woman overcomes the haughtiness of Jezebel by seeking the meekness of Christ. She pursues a “gentle and quiet spirit” (1 Peter 2:23-3:4), which is natural to Christlikeness. The woman must see God’s wisdom in the divine order of the family and honor her husband as her head. If she is unmarried, she should be submitted to the order God has established in her church as unto the Lord. Her humility and peace in serving others is a sign of destruction to the nature of Jezebel (see Philippians 1:28).

What terrifies and cripples the power of darkness more than anything else is when believers surrender totally to the person and nature of Christ. To be Christlike is to wield a powerful weapon against the enemy, because, after all, the Jezebel spirit is specifically opposed to the nature of Christ.
To have disdain and intolerance for all types of the influence of Jezebel, there must be consistency in our lives as believers. For example, many times we rejoice and worship before the Lord in church, and yet we come home later and watch immoral entertainment on television. When we tolerate the influence of the spirit of Jezebel in our private lives, we give inroads to the sanctuary of our lives. This behavior doesn’t fool God, and by being tolerant of Jezebel, we greatly hinder the flow of God’s power in our lives and our effectiveness for Him.
Some might suggest that a Jezebel spirit can simply be cast out. If it were only a demon, this would be true. However, Jezebels have a personality that has been shaped by controlling demonic thoughts. Flesh cannot be cast out. Neither can personality traits that are deeply entrenched. Therefore, the person must be willing to ruthlessly face truth and be willing to let God crucify his flesh. The flesh and its patterns must be subjected to the Holy Spirit daily in order for the person to be permanently set free.

References:
“Tragedy and Sin, Forgiveness and Restoration – My Own Deliverance Story”
http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2009/09/16/tragedy-and-sin-forgiveness-and-restoration-my-own-deliverance-story/
“The Spirit of Jezebel”
http://www.jonhamilton.org/jezebel.htm
“Jezebel, in our society”
http://www.albatrus.org/english/church-order/women-matters/jezebel_in_our_society.htm
“Jezebel Seducing Goddess of War – Jonas Clark”
http://www.amazon.com/Jezebel-Seducing-Goddess-Jonas-Clark/dp/1886885044
“Mental Disorder and Jezebel”
http://www.scribd.com/doc/13299084/The-Jezebel-Spirit-and-Mental-Health?autodown=pdf
“Confronting Jezebel: Discerning and Defeating the Spirit of Control – Steve Sampson”
http://www.stevesampson.com/jezebelbook.html
Read excerpts through this link (Google books)
“The Jezebel Spirit – Unmasking the Enemies of the Church – Francis Frangipane”
http://www.amazon.com/Jezebel-Spirit-Discernment-Francis-Frangipane/dp/0962904988
“The Spirit of Jezebel / Queen of Heaven / Harlot Spirit”
http://www.christian-faith.com/forjesus/jezebel-spirit
“Beware the Jezebel Spirit”
http://www.tlig.org/en/spirituality/letters/jezebel/
“Jezebel”
http://latter-rain.com/eschae/jezebel.htm
“Discerning The Jezebel Spirit” (4 part Youtube video)


Saturday, 25 August 2012

Gender-neutral True equality is her goal: Coverage of Roshni Mathan and CRISP in Deccan Herald 25/08/2012

True equality is her goal
http://www.deccanheraldepaper.com/svww_zoomart.php?Artname=20120825l_004100004&ileft=627&itop=135&zoomRatio=130&AN=20120825l_004100004

PROFILE Roshni Mathan Pereira is spearheading amovement to bring about reforms in family laws that could help children caught in custody battles when their parents divorce
Roshni Mathan Pereira wears many hats, and with great elan. An educator for many years, she also takes her role as counselor of CRISP (Children’s Rights Initiative for Shared Parenting) very seriously.
Roshni, who is in her late thirties, has a Bachelors degree in Education, a Masters degree in Child Education and an MBA in Educational Management. She has plenty of teaching experience, including as a PYP (Primary Years Programme) coordinator in an international school in Bangalore, and also serves on the board of trustees in a reputed school in Bangalore. Her interests lie in home schooling, e-learning, special education and international curriculum planning.

However, Roshni prefers to talk about her role as counselor of CRISP, a Bangalore-based NGO, that was founded a few years ago by Kumar Jahgirdar, among others, to combat the serious effects of parental alienation on children of divorced/separated parents. CRISP is concerned by the growing number of custody battles over children, and the consequent effect it has on young minds.

The organisation is pushing for reforms in family laws such as granting of immediate and equal child access to separated parents within 30 days from the date of filing for divorce and making co-parenting mandatory. It wants all cases related to custody of children to be disposed of within six months of application and punishment for misuse of laws, particularly related to dowry harassment and domestic violence.

Roshni counsels young men whose wives have resorted to the anti-dowry law and Domestic Violence (DV) Act to harass their husbands and deny them access to their own children. She feels women are, by and large, better communicators and are able to win the sympathy of judges in courts, thanks to their glib talk and persuasive manner. She says that it doesn’t matter if the husband is right — the courts are almost always swayed by the better communicator (the wife in nearly all cases), even when she is wrong.

Roshni counsels men and young fathers on how to communicate better and get their point across to others so that they can be heard. She says it doesn’t matter if the husband is highly educated. “All too often, I counsel MBAs and engineers from IITs who are simply unable to correspond effectively,” she says. “Men need to learn to communicate so that the harassment they are suffering on account of genderbiased laws is brought to light.” Roshni has appeared on many television programmes to voice her demands for children’s rights, and she also wants safeguards to come into place so that men do not have to suffer because of the rampant abuse of laws that were made to protect women, such as Sec 498A IPC and the DV Act. These laws, she feels, are grossly biased against men as husbands who face abuse at the hands of their wives cannot take recourse to the DV Act to demand justice. The anti-dowry law (Sec 498A IPC) is often used by vengeful wives to harass entire families, including aged in-laws, married and pregnant sisters-inlaw and young brothers-in-law, apart from the husband. And, thanks to our judicial system, the courts take many years to deliver a verdict. Convictions in cases filed under these Acts are low, and many times innocent people have to run from pillar to post, and putting their lives on hold for many years, to prove themselves not guilty.

India is a secular democracy and everybody should stand equal before the law, says Roshni. But the laws of the land have been heavily tilted against men and in favour of women, especially in the marital sphere. For instance, even when a man declines dowry, the girl often comes with abaggage of wealth. If anything goes wrong, it is the husband and his family who get the legal boot. “I’m a warrior for women’s rights, but I strongly believe that agood number of men are suffering ignominies for no fault of theirs,” she adds.

Roshni says the National Commission for Women, and Health and Family Welfare both deal with issues confronting women. However, forget a ministry, there is not even a platform for men. She believes that there must be more awareness that men are not always aggressors who ill-treat women. They often share responsibility for the entire family. They ought to get equal justice at the hands of society, the judiciary and the media. “This is an argument for gender parity, not dominance,” she adds.

Roshni is also concerned about daughters facing abuse, deprivation, neglect and maltreatment in their natal homes. She has launched the ‘All India Daughters Protection Forum’ and regularly blogs on how children, especially daughters, need to be protected from exploitative parents, relatives and siblings. She wants inheritance rights for daughters in their parental homes and she is also demanding an integrated approach to the protection of the rights of daughters. The forum, Roshni says, is also against false allegations of domestic violence and dowry against husbands and in-laws. False charges, says Roshni, is tantamount to legal abuse and is an affront to real victims.

Roshni hopes to continue blogging and counselling until any real change comes about towards the problems of men in society. This is one determined lady who has vowed to make a difference.

Nivedita Choudhuri

CRUSADER FOR RIGHTS Roshni Mathan Pereira.



Tuesday, 7 August 2012

Julian Lennon blames father John Lennon for his lack of children


Julian Lennon blames father John Lennon for his lack of children
John Lennon was such a bad father that he put his own son, Julian, off having children.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/8933287/Julian-Lennon-blames-father-John-for-his-lack-of-children.html
04 Dec 2011
Julian Lennon, 48, John Lennon's son by his first wife, Cynthia, has revealed that his difficult relationship with his famous father has discouraged him from starting a family.
John Lennon and his abandoned Son Julian Lennon
Julian, who has never married, said that – unlike his father – he wanted to be mature enough to cope with fatherhood.
“He was young and didn’t know what the hell he was doing," Julian said. "That’s the reason I haven’t had children yet. I didn’t want to do the same thing. No, I’m not ready. I want to know who I am first.”

Lennon’s comments, made in an interview with Record Collector magazine, are perhaps his most forthright yet about his relationship with his father.

Julian, himself a musician, was five when John left Cynthia for Yoko Ono in 1968. When Julian was born at the start of Beatlemania in 1963, John Lennon was away on tour. Brian Epstein, the Beatles' manager, initially covered up the fact that John was married with a child to make him more appealing to female fans.
After Lennon and Ono moved to New York in 1971, Julian did not see his father again for two years.
The pair were later reconciled, but Julian was still hurt when John gave an interview shortly before he was killed by Mark Chapman in 1980, in which he implied that Julian was an unplanned child who “came from a bottle of whiskey”.
Julian told an interviewer in September: “Mum was more about love than Dad. He sang about it, he spoke about, but he never really gave it, at least not to me as his son."
He added that he had to control the aggression he inherited from his father: “The darker side definitely comes from Dad. Whenever I get too aggressive, which comes from Dad's side, I try to calm myself down, be more positive."

Julian has, however, also shown understanding of his father’s situation – in particular the fact that he was a young parent who had himself endured a difficult childhood. John Lennon went 20 years without seeing his father Alfred and grew up living with his aunt Mimi, not his mother Julia.

Julian Lennon has also had difficult relationships with Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon, Yoko and John’s son.
In 2009, he admitted he once “unleashed hell” on Yoko over her control of the Lennon estate, but insisted the pair had since reconciled.
He has also admitted jealousy of Sean, 36, saying: “I remember thinking, when Dad gave up music for a couple of years to be with Sean, "Why couldn't he do that with me?" Those thoughts haunted me for a time.”
By 2007, however, relations between Sean and Julian had improved so much that Julian accompanied Sean, also a musician, on a tour of Croatia and Slovenia.
Julian’s childhood difficulties did, however, produce one of the Beatles’ most famous songs. Paul McCartney wrote Hey Jude as a message to Julian when he was on his way to see Cynthia as the marriage was ending. The song was originally "Hey Jules", but McCartney decided Jude scanned better before recording it.

Friday, 3 August 2012

Long-lost Lennon (Victoria Lennon) is not a Lennon: Half-sibling of John Lennon


Julia Lennon
Julia Lennon (née Stanley; 12 March 1914 – 15 July 1958) was the mother of English musician John Lennon, who was born during her marriage to Alfred Lennon. After complaints to Liverpool's Social Services by her eldest sister, Mimi Smith (née Stanley), she handed over the care of her son to her sister. 

She later had one daughter after an affair with a Welsh soldier Taffy Williams(during the Subsisting marriage with Freddie Lennon), but the baby named Victoria LENNON was given up for adoption after pressure from her family. 
John Lennon's sister Victoria "Lennon" (who he never knew)-given  up for  adoption
She then had two daughters, Julia and Jackie, with John 'Bobby' Dykins. She never divorced her husband, preferring to live as the common-law wife of Dykins for the rest of her life.

She was known as being high-spirited and impulsive, musical, and having a strong sense of humour. She taught her son how to play the banjo and ukulele, and bought his first acoustic guitar, even though her eldest sister strongly disapproved. She kept in almost daily contact with Lennon, and when he  was in his teens he often stayed overnight at her and Dykins' house. On 15 July 1958, she was struck down and killed by a car driven by an off-duty policeman, close to her sister's house at 251 Menlove Avenue. Lennon was traumatised by her death and wrote several songs about her, including "Julia" and "Mother." 

Marriage to Alf Lennon
Alfred 'Freddie' Lennon—always called 'Alf' by his family—was always joking but never held a job for very long, preferring to visit Liverpool's many vaudeville theatres and cinemas, where he knew the usherettes by name. At the Trocadero club, a converted cinema on Camden Road, Liverpool, he first saw an "auburn-haired girl with a bright smile and high cheekbones"; Julia Stanley. He saw her again in Sefton Park, where he had gone with a friend to meet girls. Lennon, who was dressed in a bowler hat and with a cigarette holder in hand, saw "this little waif" sitting on a wrought-iron bench. Julia (14 years old) said that his hat looked "silly", to which the 15-year-old Alf replied that she looked "lovely", and sat down next to her. She asked him to take off his hat, so he promptly threw it straight into the Sefton Park lake.

Despite standing only five feet two inches tall in heels, she often caught the gaze of men in the street, being attractive and full-figured. She was always well-dressed and even went to bed with make-up on so as to "look beautiful when she woke up". A nephew later said that she could "make a joke out of nothing", and could have "walked out of a burning house with a smile and a joke". She frequented Liverpool's dance halls and clubs where she was often asked to dance in jitterbug competitions with dockers, soldiers, sailors, and waiters. 
On 3 December 1938, 11 years after they had first met, she married Alf Lennon after she had proposed to him. They were married in the Bolton Street Registry Office, although none of her family were present as she had not informed them about the wedding. She wrote 'cinema usherette' as her occupation on the marriage certificate, even though she had never been one. They spent their honeymoon eating at Reece's restaurant in Clayton Square (which is where their son would later celebrate after his marriage to Cynthia Powell), and then went to a cinema. She walked into 9 Newcastle Road waving the marriage licence and said to her family, "There!—I've married him." It was an act of defiance against her father, who had threatened to disown her if she ever cohabitated with a lover. On their wedding night, she stayed at her parents' house, and Lennon went back to his boarding house. The next day, he went back to sea for three months, on a ship bound for the West Indies.

The Stanley family completely ignored her husband at first, believing him to be of "no use to anyone—certainly not our Julia". Her father demanded that Lennon present something concrete to show that he could financially support his daughter, but Lennon signed on as a Merchant Navy steward on a ship bound for the Mediterranean. He returned after a few months at sea and moved into the Stanley home. He auditioned for local theatre managers as an entertainer but had no success. Julia found out that she was pregnant (with John) in January 1940, but as the war had started her husband continued to serve as a merchant seaman during World War II, sending money home regularly. The payments stopped after Alf deserted in 1943.

She gave birth to John Winston Lennon on 9 October 1940, in the second-floor ward of the Oxford Street Maternity Hospital in Liverpool, during World War II. Her eldest sister, Mimi, phoned the hospital and was told that she had given birth to a boy. According to Mimi, she went straight to the hospital during the middle of an air raid, and was forced to hide in doorways to avoid the shrapnel from falling bombs. She ran, as she later recalled, "as fast as my legs could carry me". Lennon was named after his paternal grandfather, and Winston Churchill. Alf was not present at Lennon's birth, as he was at sea.

The infant Lennon started at his first school in November 1945—Mosspits, on Mosspits Lane, Wavertree—so she found a part-time job at a café near the school. After numerous criticisms from the Stanley family about their (still-married), daughter 'living in sin' with Dykins, and considerable pressure from Mimi—who twice contacted Liverpool's Social Services to complain about the infant Lennon sleeping in the same bed as Julia and Dykins—she reluctantly handed the care of Lennon over to Mimi and her husband, George Smith.

In July 1946, Alf visited Mimi's house, 'Mendips' at 251 Menlove Avenue, and took Lennon to Blackpool for a long holiday, but he was secretly intending to emigrate to New Zealand with him. Julia and Dykins found out and followed them to Blackpool. Alf asked Julia to go with them both to New Zealand, but she refused. After a heated argument, Alf said their five-year-old child had to choose between his mother or him. He chose Alf (twice) so Julia walked away, but in the end but her son (crying), followed her. Alf lost contact with the family until Beatlemania, when he and his son met again.

She took John back to her house and enrolled him in a local school, but after few weeks she handed him back to Mimi. Various reasons have been suggested for her decision, such as Dykins' unwillingness to raise the young boy, Julia's inability to cope with the responsibility, or a punishment forced on her by Mimi and her father for "living in sin". 

Lennon blamed himself, saying later, "My mother... couldn't cope with me."

Victoria "LENNON"
During 1942–1943, Julia lived with her son at The Dairy Cottage; 120a Allerton Road, Woolton.[30] The cottage was owned by Mimi's husband, and Mimi wanted Julia to live there because they would be closer to her house and also out of the Stanley house. As Alf was often away at sea, Julia started going out to dance halls. In 1942, she met a Welsh soldier named 'Taffy' Williams who was stationed in the barracks at Mossley Hill.
Birth Records of Victoria "Lennon"
She became pregnant by Williams in late 1944, though first claiming that she had been raped by an unknown soldier. Williams refused to live with Julia—who was still married to Alf—until she gave up John, which she refused to do. 
When Alf eventually came home in 1944, he offered to look after his wife, their son, and the expected baby, but she rejected the idea.
Alf took John to his brother Sydney's house, in the Liverpool suburb of Maghull, a few months before Julia came to term. Julia's daughter, Victoria Elizabeth, born in the Elmswood Nursing Home on 19 June 1945, was subsequently given up for adoption to a Norwegian Salvation Army Captain (Peder and Margaret Pedersen) after intense pressure from the Stanley family.


Lennon was not told about Victoria's birth—who was later renamed Ingrid Marie Pedersen—and it is not known if he ever knew of her existence.

John 'Bobby' Dykins
Julia started seeing Dykins a year after Victoria's birth (although they had known each other before) when she was working in the café near Lennon's primary school; Mosspits. Dykins was a good-looking, well-dressed man who worked at the Adelphi Hotel in Liverpool as a wine steward. She later moved into a small flat in Gateacre with Dykins. He enjoyed luxuries, and had access to rationed goods like alcohol, chocolate, silk stockings and cigarettes, which was what initially attracted her. The Stanley sisters called him "Spiv", because of his pencil-thin moustache, margarine-coated hair, and pork-pie hat, and the young Lennon called him "Twitchy" because of a physical tic/nervous cough. Julia's family and friends remembered that he also had a fiery temperament, which could result in his being violent when drunk. Lennon remembered seeing his mother during a visit to Mimi's, when her face was bleeding after being hit by Dykins.

Dykins later managed several bars in Liverpool, which allowed Julia to stay at home and look after their two daughters (Julia and Jackie) and Lennon, who often visited and stayed overnight, at 1 Blomfield Road, Liverpool. Lennon and McCartney would rehearse in the bathroom of the house where the acoustics "sounded like a recording studio". Dykins used to give Lennon weekly pocket money (one shilling) for doing odd jobs, on top of the five shillings that Mimi gave him. In December 1965, Dykins was killed in a car crash at the bottom of Penny Lane, but Lennon was not told about his death for months afterwards, as it was "not [Stanley] family business".
Baird and Jackie later met their half-sister, Victoria/Ingrid, when they were present at the ceremony to place a Blue Heritage plaque on Mimi's house to commemorate the fact that Lennon had lived there. Stanley Parkes (Lennon's nephew) was on the ladder fixing the plaque to the wall and said, "I think I can see Ingrid" [walking towards the house]. Baird and her sister were surprised, as it meant that Parkes had seen Ingrid before, even though Baird and Jackie never had. When all three finally met for the first time Baird was shocked that Ingrid did not look anything like the Stanley family, as she had "pale blue eyes and fair hair".
Victoria Lennon (identified as half-sister of John Lennon in 1998)
Influence on John Lennon
Her death traumatised the teenaged Lennon, and for the next two years he drank heavily and frequently got into fights, consumed by a "blind rage". It contributed to the emotional difficulties that haunted him for much of his life, but also served to draw him closer to McCartney, who had also lost his mother at a young age. Julia's memory inspired songs such as the 1968 Beatles song "Julia", with its dreamlike imagery of "hair of floating sky glimmering", recalling Lennon's boyhood memories of his mother. Lennon remarked that the song "was sort of a combination of Yoko [Ono] and my mother blended into one." "Mother" and "My Mummy's Dead" were both written under the influence of Arthur Janov's "Primal Scream" therapy, and released on his solo album John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band in 1970. Lennon's first son, Julian, born in 1963, was named after her. She has been described as "to a great extent... her son's muse."

Nowhere Man/Boy John Lennon: Made Fatherless and Motherless by his wayward Mother Julia

Julia Lennon
Julia Lennon (née Stanley; 12 March 1914 – 15 July 1958) was the mother of English musician John Lennon, who was born during her marriage to Alfred Lennon. After complaints to Liverpool's Social Services by her eldest sister, Mimi Smith (née Stanley), she handed over the care of her son to her sister. 

She later had one daughter after an affair with a Welsh soldier, but the baby was given up for adoption after pressure from her family. 
John Lennon's sister Victoria (who he never knew)-given  up for  adoption
She then had two daughters, Julia and Jackie, with John 'Bobby' Dykins. She never divorced her husband, preferring to live as the common-law wife of Dykins for the rest of her life.

She was known as being high-spirited and impulsive, musical, and having a strong sense of humour. She taught her son how to play the banjo and ukulele, and bought his first acoustic guitar, even though her eldest sister strongly disapproved. She kept in almost daily contact with Lennon, and when he  was in his teens he often stayed overnight at her and Dykins' house. On 15 July 1958, she was struck down and killed by a car driven by an off-duty policeman, close to her sister's house at 251 Menlove Avenue. Lennon was traumatised by her death and wrote several songs about her, including "Julia" and "Mother." Biographer Ian MacDonald wrote that she was, "to a great extent... her son's muse."

Marriage to Alf Lennon
Alfred 'Freddie' Lennon—always called 'Alf' by his family—was always joking but never held a job for very long, preferring to visit Liverpool's many vaudeville theatres and cinemas, where he knew the usherettes by name. At the Trocadero club, a converted cinema on Camden Road, Liverpool, he first saw an "auburn-haired girl with a bright smile and high cheekbones"; Julia Stanley. He saw her again in Sefton Park, where he had gone with a friend to meet girls. Lennon, who was dressed in a bowler hat and with a cigarette holder in hand, saw "this little waif" sitting on a wrought-iron bench. Julia (14 years old) said that his hat looked "silly", to which the 15-year-old Alf replied that she looked "lovely", and sat down next to her. She asked him to take off his hat, so he promptly threw it straight into the Sefton Park lake.

Despite standing only five feet two inches tall in heels, she often caught the gaze of men in the street, being attractive and full-figured. She was always well-dressed and even went to bed with make-up on so as to "look beautiful when she woke up". A nephew later said that she could "make a joke out of nothing", and could have "walked out of a burning house with a smile and a joke". She frequented Liverpool's dance halls and clubs where she was often asked to dance in jitterbug competitions with dockers, soldiers, sailors, and waiters. It was remarked that she could be as humorous as any man and would sing the popular songs of the day at any time of day or night Her voice sounded similar to Vera Lynn's, whilst Lennon specialised in impersonating Louis Armstrong and Al Jolson. She played the ukelele, the piano accordion, and the banjo (as did Lennon), although neither pursued music professionally. They spent their days together walking around Liverpool and talking of what they would do in the future: opening a shop, a pub, a cafe, or a club

On 3 December 1938, 11 years after they had first met, she married Alf Lennon after she had proposed to him. They were married in the Bolton Street Registry Office, although none of her family were present as she had not informed them about the wedding. She wrote 'cinema usherette' as her occupation on the marriage certificate, even though she had never been one. They spent their honeymoon eating at Reece's restaurant in Clayton Square (which is where their son would later celebrate after his marriage to Cynthia Powell), and then went to a cinema. She walked into 9 Newcastle Road waving the marriage licence and said to her family, "There!—I've married him." It was an act of defiance against her father, who had threatened to disown her if she ever cohabitated with a lover. On their wedding night, she stayed at her parents' house, and Lennon went back to his boarding house. The next day, he went back to sea for three months, on a ship bound for the West Indies.
The Stanley family completely ignored her husband at first, believing him to be of "no use to anyone—certainly not our Julia". Her father demanded that Lennon present something concrete to show that he could financially support his daughter, but Lennon signed on as a Merchant Navy steward on a ship bound for the Mediterranean. He returned after a few months at sea and moved into the Stanley home. He auditioned for local theatre managers as an entertainer but had no success. Julia found out that she was pregnant (with John) in January 1940, but as the war had started her husband continued to serve as a merchant seaman during World War II, sending money home regularly. The payments stopped after Alf deserted in 1943.

She gave birth to John Winston Lennon on 9 October 1940, in the second-floor ward of the Oxford Street Maternity Hospital in Liverpool, during World War II. Her eldest sister, Mimi, phoned the hospital and was told that she had given birth to a boy. According to Mimi, she went straight to the hospital during the middle of an air raid, and was forced to hide in doorways to avoid the shrapnel from falling bombs. She ran, as she later recalled, "as fast as my legs could carry me". Lennon was named after his paternal grandfather, and Winston Churchill. Alf was not present at Lennon's birth, as he was at sea.

The infant Lennon started at his first school in November 1945—Mosspits, on Mosspits Lane, Wavertree—so she found a part-time job at a café near the school. After numerous criticisms from the Stanley family about their (still-married), daughter 'living in sin' with Dykins, and considerable pressure from Mimi—who twice contacted Liverpool's Social Services to complain about the infant Lennon sleeping in the same bed as Julia and Dykins—she reluctantly handed the care of Lennon over to Mimi and her husband, George Smith.

In July 1946, Alf visited Mimi's house, 'Mendips' at 251 Menlove Avenue, and took Lennon to Blackpool for a long holiday, but he was secretly intending to emigrate to New Zealand with him. Julia and Dykins found out and followed them to Blackpool. Alf asked Julia to go with them both to New Zealand, but she refused. After a heated argument, Alf said their five-year-old child had to choose between his mother or him. He chose Alf (twice) so Julia walked away, but in the end but her son (crying), followed her. Alf lost contact with the family until Beatlemania, when he and his son met again.

She took John back to her house and enrolled him in a local school, but after few weeks she handed him back to Mimi. Various reasons have been suggested for her decision, such as Dykins' unwillingness to raise the young boy, Julia's inability to cope with the responsibility, or a punishment forced on her by Mimi and her father for "living in sin". 

Lennon blamed himself, saying later, "My mother... couldn't cope with me." He then lived continuously at 'Mendips', in the smallest bedroom above the front door, with Mimi determined to give him a "proper upbringing". Julia later bought Lennon his first guitar for £5/10- (five pounds, ten shillings) after Lennon had pestered her incessantly for weeks, but insisted it had to be delivered to her house, not her sister's. As Lennon had difficulty learning chords, she taught him banjo and ukulele chords, which were simpler, and later taught Lennon how to play the piano accordion.

Victoria
During 1942–1943, Julia lived with her son at The Dairy Cottage; 120a Allerton Road, Woolton. The cottage was owned by Mimi's husband, and Mimi wanted Julia to live there because they would be closer to her house and also out of the Stanley house. As Alf was often away at sea, Julia started going out to dance halls. In 1942, she met a Welsh soldier named 'Taffy' Williams who was stationed in the barracks at Mossley Hill.
Birth Records of Victoria "Lennon"

She became pregnant by Williams in late 1944, though first claiming that she had been raped by an unknown soldier. Williams refused to live with Julia—who was still married to Alf—until she gave up John, which she refused to do. 

When Alf eventually came home in 1944, he offered to look after his wife, their son, and the expected baby, but she rejected the idea.

Alf took John to his brother Sydney's house, in the Liverpool suburb of Maghull, a few months before Julia came to term. Julia's daughter, Victoria Elizabeth, born in the Elmswood Nursing Home on 19 June 1945, was subsequently given up for adoption to a Norwegian Salvation Army Captain (Peder and Margaret Pedersen) after intense pressure from the Stanley family.
Lennon was not told about Victoria's birth—who was later renamed Ingrid Marie Pedersen—and it is not known if he ever knew of her existence.

John 'Bobby' Dykins
Julia started seeing Dykins a year after Victoria's birth (although they had known each other before) when she was working in the café near Lennon's primary school; Mosspits. Dykins was a good-looking, well-dressed man who worked at the Adelphi Hotel in Liverpool as a wine steward. She later moved into a small flat in Gateacre with Dykins. He enjoyed luxuries, and had access to rationed goods like alcohol, chocolate, silk stockings and cigarettes, which was what initially attracted her. The Stanley sisters called him "Spiv", because of his pencil-thin moustache, margarine-coated hair, and pork-pie hat, and the young Lennon called him "Twitchy" because of a physical tic/nervous cough. Julia's family and friends remembered that he also had a fiery temperament, which could result in his being violent when drunk. Lennon remembered seeing his mother during a visit to Mimi's, when her face was bleeding after being hit by Dykins.

Dykins later managed several bars in Liverpool, which allowed Julia to stay at home and look after their two daughters (Julia and Jackie) and Lennon, who often visited and stayed overnight, at 1 Blomfield Road, Liverpool. Lennon and McCartney would rehearse in the bathroom of the house where the acoustics "sounded like a recording studio". Dykins used to give Lennon weekly pocket money (one shilling) for doing odd jobs, on top of the five shillings that Mimi gave him. In December 1965, Dykins was killed in a car crash at the bottom of Penny Lane, but Lennon was not told about his death for months afterwards, as it was "not [Stanley] family business".

Baird and Jackie later met their half-sister, Victoria/Ingrid, when they were present at the ceremony to place a Blue Heritage plaque on Mimi's house to commemorate the fact that Lennon had lived there. Stanley Parkes (Lennon's nephew) was on the ladder fixing the plaque to the wall and said, "I think I can see Ingrid" [walking towards the house]. Baird and her sister were surprised, as it meant that Parkes had seen Ingrid before, even though Baird and Jackie never had. When all three finally met for the first time Baird was shocked that Ingrid did not look anything like the Stanley family, as she had "pale blue eyes and fair hair".
Victoria Lennon (identified as half-sister of John Lennon in 1998)
Influence on John Lennon
Her death traumatised the teenaged Lennon, and for the next two years he drank heavily and frequently got into fights, consumed by a "blind rage". It contributed to the emotional difficulties that haunted him for much of his life, but also served to draw him closer to McCartney, who had also lost his mother at a young age. Julia's memory inspired songs such as the 1968 Beatles song "Julia", with its dreamlike imagery of "hair of floating sky glimmering", recalling Lennon's boyhood memories of his mother. Lennon remarked that the song "was sort of a combination of Yoko [Ono] and my mother blended into one." "Mother" and "My Mummy's Dead" were both written under the influence of Arthur Janov's "Primal Scream" therapy, and released on his solo album John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band in 1970. Lennon's first son, Julian, born in 1963, was named after her. She has been described as "to a great extent... her son's muse."

How John Lennon sabotaged his dishwasher dad's bid to be a pop star: Close friend tells story of the Beatle's hard-drinking father Freddie Lennon


How John Lennon sabotaged his dishwasher dad's bid to be a pop star: Close friend tells story of the Beatle's hard-drinking father Freddie Lennon 
30 July 2012
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2181327/How-John-Lennon-sabotaged-dishwasher-dads-bid-pop-star.html

My best mate, the man I grew to admire more than anyone I knew, was washing dishes in a pub kitchen when I was first introduced to him.
He looked a right state then. Down on his luck, both his front teeth missing, earning just a tenner a week.
I could hardly believe it when he announced who he was — Freddie Lennon, father of the Beatles genius John Lennon. But behind that battered exterior lay a heart of gold, and a strong rapport quickly formed between us.
Heartbroken: Freddie Lennon, father of John Lennon of The Beatles, relaxing on a park bench. Freddie died in Brighton in 1976, having been estranged from his famous son for many years

I vowed to set Freddie on his feet and give him a shot at making his own fortune.
Over a rollercoaster ten years, I saw Freddie’s relationship with John go through terrifying highs and lows. When times were good, they shared a home, they sang songs together and they had great times in pubs and nightclubs.
But during the worst times, when John was fuelled with jealousy and drug-heightened paranoia, he sabotaged his father’s dreams, slammed the door in his face and even threatened to kill him. Whatever their differences, however, there is no doubt in my mind that without Freddie’s honesty and decency The Beatles could never have existed.

Freddie was a great storyteller. As soon as you met him he’d be off, relating his life story to anyone who’d listen. He was born in 1912 in Liverpool — one of eight children living in a single room, where there wasn’t enough space for them all to lie down and sleep. At the age of six, Freddie was sent to a workhouse school, where he could at least have a meal and a bed.
‘John thinks he’s had a hard life,’ Freddie told me once. ‘He doesn’t know how tough life can be.’
Freddie joined the merchant navy in his teens, hoping to see the world. By then he had already met the woman who would be John’s mother. Her name was Julia; she was just 14 and Freddie was 15 when they first started going out together.
After 11 years of courtship, they  married in 1938. When war came the following year and Freddie was sent out on the merchant convoys, Julia was already pregnant.
Reunion: Freddie Lennon met John again when he was a superstar

Freddie adored his baby son, John. He had a few weeks’ leave when the boy was 18 months old, but there was a war on. He was sent away again — and when he returned, in 1944, his wife was pregnant once more, this time with another man’s baby. She told him their marriage was over and, despite his pleas, they separated.
But his love for John was undiminished.
After the war, during long-overdue leave from his seafaring, Freddie took six-year-old John on a holiday to Blackpool. John’s mother could not cope with him on her own and had sent him to live  with her older sister Aunt Mimi. He was thrilled to see his father, and for the first time they were able to do the kind of things that dads want to do with their sons — a walk on the beach, ice creams together, paddling in the sea.
Freddie had begun to form a plan, to emigrate with his boy to New Zealand. But Mimi got wind of the plan and told John’s mother. One day there was a knock on the door: it was Julia, with her new man, Bobby Dykins, a black market spiv who would become a wine bar manager. She’d come to take John to live with her back in Liverpool.
In a heart-wrenching scene she told John he would never see her again if he stayed with his father. She turned and walked away and the little boy ran down the street after her, sobbing and crying her name.
‘That broke my heart,’ Freddie said. He spent the next two decades at sea as a galley hand on merchant ships, and all contact between him and John was broken off. By the time he came back in the mid-Sixties, John was a superstar.
In 1965 Freddie found work washing the pots at the Ship Inn in Shepperton, Surrey — by coincidence, just a few miles from the millionaire’s enclave of Weybridge, where John Lennon had his home.
It was Tom Jones’s dad who found Freddie first — he was visiting Tom, who lived nearby, and stopped off at the pub for a pint. When he mentioned that his boy had a pop record in the charts, the barman said: ‘That’s nothing! We’ve got a Beatle’s dad scrubbing the plates in the kitchen!’
I was managing Tom at the time. When we heard the story, we went to the Ship Inn to find out the truth for ourselves. Freddie accepted my offer of a few beers gladly, and a firm friendship sprang up between us.
I loved his Scouser’s wit and sea- faring tales — one of the wildest, about how he nearly had to face a firing squad in Argentina after smashing a window during a night of hell-raising in Buenos Aires, made my hair stand on end.
Freddie was a born entertainer, and had a rich, emotional singing voice with which he regaled the whole pub. He didn’t want to hitch a ride on the Beatles bandwagon, but I sensed that he could be a star in his own right.
News gets around, and the next day, I had The Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein on the phone. ‘Tell me it’s not true, Tony,’ he pleaded. ‘Is John’s dad really a kitchen porter? What are the papers going to make of that!’
I took him to Eppy’s office, next to the London Palladium. Paul McCartney and George Harrison were there, and they guessed who he was straight away. ‘All right, John’s dad?’ called George. ‘Where’s yer front teeth then?’ Freddie just grinned — he owed that gap-toothed smile to an accident long ago, onboard a ship.
Nowhere boy: John Lennon as a child with his mother Julia, who was killed in 1958 in a road accident

I looked around, surprised that John wasn’t there. Eppy gestured over his shoulder: ‘John’s in the other room, watching through the little window.’  That told me all I needed to know — this was going to be a difficult relationship.
I’d known John since 1962, when The Beatles used to appear on the same bill as my childhood friend Freddie Fowell, whose stage name was Freddie Starr. By 1966, I was a manager, an impresario — or trying to be — like Eppy and like the Stones’  manager, Andrew Loog Oldham.
My instinct told me Freddie Lennon could have a massive hit record with the right song. So I set about writing it for him. I scribbled some lines down, inspired by Freddie’s stories: ‘I watched the sun rise over every ocean . . .’ It was called That’s My Life, That’s My Love, That’s My Home.
Back in those days, the manager’s big job was to talk up the deals. I knew how to do that, and I quickly signed a recording contract with Pye, a record label who handled massive artists including Lonnie Donegan and Sandie Shaw. Then I set up a royalty deal for the song rights: The Beatles’ music publisher, Dick James, offered me £300, but a couple of phone calls later I had £1,000 from Cyril Simons at Leeds Music.
Freddie was amazed. He didn’t even have a bank account — you don’t need one when you make a tenner a week.
I took him to get a new suit and some new teeth, and then I took him to the Bag O’ Nails club in Soho to see two musicians who were going to be part of his backing band — the drummer Mitch Mitchell and the bassist Noel Redding. They were part of a trio with a new American sensation, the guitarist Jimi Hendrix, and in the Bag O’ Nails that night everyone was there: The Beatles, the Stones, Eric Clapton.
John sat with us. ‘Make sure my da’ doesn’t have too much to drink,’ he warned me. I couldn’t believe my ears — John was clearly tripping out of his mind on LSD, and he was worried about Freddie having a couple of pints?
Potential: Freddie, 53, with his record 'That's My Life...'

At the recording studios in Wimbledon, Freddie was very nervous. He took one look at the 30-piece orchestra and said: ‘I’ve got to have a drink.’ Of course, no one was allowed to drink in the studio, but I nipped out and got him a couple of bottles of strong ale.
The song was beautiful. It began with waves on a shore, and then a pulsing piano chimed in. If you heard it now, you might feel a shock of recognition — it is almost identical to John’s biggest hit, Imagine, which was recorded six years later. I’ve always wondered if John might have consciously or unconsciously copied his father’s song.
The record shot up the charts on the continent, and started selling strongly in the States. Morris Levy of Roulette Records called me from America and said: ‘You gotta bring papa Lennon over here. He’s sold 180,000 singles already, it’s a hit in nine states.’
We flew to Amsterdam, to do a Dutch TV show, which had Freddie in a terrible sweat — he thought he was going to have to sing live in Dutch. He was so relieved when I told him he’d be miming in English, he almost fell over.
And then something astonishing happened. The record vanished from the charts. In Europe and the  U.S., it was pulled. Only a very few music business figures had the power to do that, and I had my suspicions about who was behind it. Others accused Brian Epstein, but Eppy was my friend, and I knew he wouldn’t sabotage my record — unless John told him to do it.
Why would John wreck his own father’s career? Sheer jealousy and insecurity are the only motives I can guess at. We drove to Weybridge to confront John, but he slammed the door in our faces.
Freddie was heartbroken, and immediately gave up the music business. ‘It’s brought me nothing but unhappiness,’ he said. ‘I’d rather go back to washing pots.’ And so he did, with a rather surprising result.
In the kitchens of a shabby hotel called the Toby Jug in London, Freddie met the love of his life. She was 35 years younger than him, just 18 years old, but the gap didn’t matter. Her name was Pauline, and though her family did not approve, she loved Freddie.
Finally, Freddie’s luck was running the right way. He sent a Christmas card to John, and got a letter by the next post. John had been to India with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, The Beatles’ Indian spiritual guru, who told him to seek his father’s forgiveness. ‘You should look after him,’ the Maharishi said, ‘for your father gave you life.’
When John returned, he asked Freddie and Pauline to move in with him at his Weybridge mansion, called Kenwood. Pauline became John’s fan club secretary, and Freddie embraced a life of leisure. I’d drop by to take him to the pub. Some days it was all happy families — then they wouldn’t see John for days. When he was heavily stoned, he simply forgot they were there.
When Pauline turned 21, she was able to marry Freddie, by then 56, without her family’s interference. Soon they were expecting the first of two children, and decided to move into a house of their own. It was then that things took a dark turn.
At the time, around 1970, the Beatles were splitting up — and John had fallen for a horrific kind of psychobabble called primal scream therapy. The therapist, a strange man called Arthur Janov, would put him into a trance in a soundproofed room, and ask questions designed to dig up painful memories of his childhood. John was encouraged to act out his infantile rage against his father, screaming and battering the floor like a toddler.
Rift: Freddie, seen beside the Rochdale Canal, died just five years before his superstar son was shot dead

One day, John invited Freddie, Pauline and their baby David to his new house at Tittenhurst Park near Ascot, to which he’d moved from Weybridge, and a terrifying scene blew up. ‘John looked so weird,’ Freddie told me, ‘with this vacant look in his eyes. It was the drugs: they had turned his brain.’
John seized Freddie by the lapels and shook him, screaming and howling at him. The baby was crying too. John told his father if he went to the press with his life story, he would lock him in a crate and throw him out of a plane into the ocean to be drowned. Freddie believed his son was unbalanced enough to do just that.
Freddie never saw John again. The relationship between father and son had been damaged beyond repair — the nightmare combination of John’s drug abuse and primal scream therapy proved too much.

I went to live in Las Vegas, but I kept in touch with Freddie and Pauline. I was saddened but not surprised when, five years later, my old pal died, aged just 63. It was 1975 — and John himself had just five years to live, before a deranged gunman killed him in New York. Pauline and I were the only people at Freddie’s funeral in Brighton. John didn’t come, and he never met his two half-brothers, Pauline’s sons David and Robin. But he sent  flowers, and he and his dad had a reconciliation, by phone, during the last two days of Freddie’s life.
Freddie Lennon got his chance at happiness late in life and seized it with both hands. While Pauline went out to work, he was a house husband, looking after his two young children as tenderly as any mother.
When he pushed the pram near their Brighton home, everyone thought he was a granddad, but he didn’t mind. It was enough to be with his children every day, the way he had never been able to with John.
I believe that John Lennon learned from his father’s example. When he and Yoko had a baby, Sean, he gave up his career to look after his own son. He too was a full-time dad. In the end, they both experienced the love they longed for.